The Rise of the Collaborative Warehouse Robot

May 3, 2019

Two Locus Robotics mobile robots at work with a staffer picking products at a warehouse

Locus Robotic Corp. robots resemble motorized stools with shelving and touchscreens. They operate in groups and use sensors to navigate through warehouses as workers pick items and move on. They are part of a new generation of automated tools known as collaborative robots because they work with human staffers. They come equipped with software that ties together inventory management data and warehouse management systems to help the robots quickly locate products in vast warehouses and figure out the fastest, most efficient path to the goods. Continue reading

Scheduling Your Fleet of Planes When 737s Cannot Fly

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Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 MAX aircraft parked in Victorville, Calif

Airlines around the world sped Boeing’s 737 Max into service, eager to capitalize on its efficient engines, writes The New York Times (April 12, 2019). Some low-cost carriers built new routes around the Max, which could travel farther on less fuel than its predecessor. But with the Max grounded following two deadly crashes, the airlines that rely on its planes are scrambling to adjust, and the costs are mounting. Continue reading

Using Ultrasonic Sounds to Keep the Beer Flowing

January 28, 2019

Anheuser-Busch uses this sensor to pick up ultrasonic sounds coming off conveyor belt and motors.

The world’s largest beer maker is using low-cost sensors and machine learning to predict when motors at a Colorado brewery might malfunction, reports The Wall Street Journal (Jan. 24, 2019).  The Anheuser-Busch plant was the first among the company’s 350 beer facilities to test whether wireless sensors that can detect ultrasonic sounds—beyond the grasp of the human ear—can be analyzed to predict when machines need maintenance. “You can start hearing days in advance that something will go wrong, and you’ll know within hours when it’ll fail. It’s really, for us, very practical,” said the VP.

The installation at the brewery cost just $20,000. Since the system was deployed, it has predicted pending equipment failures and prevented unscheduled production-line halts, and more than $200,000 in product loss. (The Colorado plant employs 580 people and ships 225 truckloads of Budweiser, Bud Light and other beer brands each day). Continue reading